THE LARGEST PRIVATE ANIMAL HOSPITAL IN THE NORTHWEST OPENS IN IDAHO

 WestVet Animal Emergency and Specialty Center invites the public to a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony and Open House on Saturday, January 17, 2017 to see the new state-of-the-art facility.

Garden City, Idaho – WestVet, Idaho’s only small animal emergency and specialty center, now operates out of a state-of-the-art 32,000 square foot trauma center. Located at the corner of Chinden and 50th in Garden City, the animal hospital remains one of the largest and most progressive in the Northwest. WestVet serves patients from throughout Idaho, Eastern Oregon, Montana, Wyoming, Nevada, and Utah.

The general public is invited to a formal ribbon cutting at 3:30 PM. Garden City Mayor John Evans and members of the Garden City Chamber of Commerce will be in attendance. A letter from Governor Butch Otter will be shared. Immediately following the ceremony, WestVet staff will lead behind-the-scenes tours of the animal trauma center and provide refreshments.

The new trauma center. Design and construction focused primarily on serving the needs of patients and pet owners. This includes the following design elements:

  • A new treatment modality: a small animal hyperbaric oxygen chamber used for wound management and various inflammatory diseases
  • 16 exam rooms
  • Feline-only treatment areas
  • A full physiotherapy suite for land and water therapy
  • An electric hoist and track system for large dogs
  • An expanded comprehensive diagnostic laboratory, led by veterinary pathologists, servicing WestVet and several area veterinary hospitals
  • An outdoor sanctuary and indoor comfort room, complete with a home-living environment, affording families a more natural environment for visitation and peaceful euthanasia
  • An advanced intensive care unit for critically sick patients.
  • 5 state-of-the-art surgery suites, along with a designated anesthesia recovery area
  • Cutting-edge imaging services such as CT and MRI

In addition to treatment advancements, the new hospital comprises multiple means for owner-pet interaction such as the ICU visitation area. The new design enables owners to privately visit critically sick or injured pets – a goal that remained at the forefront for Dr. Jeff Brourman, WestVet Chief of Staff, and Veterinary Surgeon. “Doing things that foster the human-animal bond served as inspiration for several areas of our hospital.”

For veterinary professionals, the large auditorium-style classroom provides space for continuing education on cutting-edge veterinary medicine practices. As a referral center, WestVet maintains a close working relationship with family practice veterinarians and professionals and provides continuing education lectures to them on a regular basis.

Hospital design alone comprised a two-year undertaking. Brourman consulted with numerous veterinary professionals and architects in developing this progressive and innovative facility.

Dr. Brouman says his inspiration to expand specialty services that were available in the Treasure Valley grew, along with the patient load. “We have been pleased to serve the pets of the northwest,” Brourman said. “Our only challenge has been to accommodate the growing number and needs of our patients. Building the new hospital enabled us to expand services and improve care to our patients and their owners.”

About WestVet.

Idaho’s only multi-specialty, 24-hour emergency veterinary hospital, is locally owned by Dr. Jeff Brourman, Dr. John Chandler, and Dr. Carrie Breaux. Hospital details include:

  • 36 veterinarians; 18 of whom are board-certified veterinary specialists
  • 140 total staff members
  • A unique internship training and joint residency program, in partnership with Washington State University – only one other such program exists
  • In October 2015, WestVet achieved Level 1 certification from the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Society (VECCS). This distinction places the trauma center among the top 1% of veterinary hospitals in the country; only 18 veterinary emergency centers have earned that honor.
  • Current veterinary specialties provided:
    • surgery
    • internal medicine
    • emergency/critical care
    • ophthalmology
    • radiology
    • oncology
    • cardiology
    • dentistry
    • dermatology
    • physiotherapy
    • pathology
    • feline behavior

The new state-of-the-art care center will allow WestVet specialists to better serve Idaho pets and area family veterinarians that utilize its services.


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Classes for Pet Owners American Red Cross Dog First Aid

WestVet and Boise Schools Community Education invite pet owners to join us for a dog emergency care class and tour of our new building.

Dog First Aid Courses. WestVet surgery manager Erica Mattox, CVT (VTS) ECC, will lead two sessions of the certified American Red Cross Dog First Aid course.

Students will learn critical skills that may save your best friend's life, including:

  • canine breathingWestVet dog first aid classes for pet owners through Boise Schools Community Education
  • cardiac emergencies
  • identifying symptoms of stress/illness
  • emergency preparation

Plus, participate in hands-on practice with CPR skills, rescue breathing, muzzling and bandaging work.

Two sessions are available: Tuesday, February 21, or Thursday, March 16. Class is from 6 to 9 PM; tuition is $58.

You may register HERE.

For more information about the American Red Cross Dog First Aid Course, click HERE.

Participants receive a DVD and a certificate of completion from the American Red Cross.

All classes with Community Education include a tour of the WestVet 24/7 Animal Emergency Hospital.

Our employees volunteer to teach with Boise Schools Community Education; all tuition and fees support this important program in the Treasure Valley.

If you have any questions, you may contact them at 208.854.4047.


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Pet Safety in Frigid Temperatures

With Treasure Valley stilling digging out – and subzero temperatures for a few days -- protecting pets from hypothermia, frostbite and deicing salts and chemicals is critical to avoiding veterinary emergencies.

Pets need our help to stay warm and safe in winter.

Wellness exams. Cold weather may exacerbate certain medical conditions such as arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, or hormonal imbalances. One simple preventative measure? Have your pet examined by your family veterinarian annually. They can provide individualized care and information based on your pet’s medical history and needs.

Frigid/extreme cold. Just as intense heat is harmful to pets, single digit and sub-zero temperatures can be simply dangerous. Your pet’s ability to manage cold varies, dependent on:

  • age
  •  the density of coatWestVet is available 24/7 for pet emergencies in Idaho
  • body type (lean and muscular vs. stocky)
  • general activity level
  •  overall health

The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) states that while long-haired or thick-coated dogs tend to be more cold-tolerant, all animals remain at risk in cold weather. Short-haired pets feel the cold faster. Short-legged pets’ bellies and bodies are more likely to come into contact with the snow.
Beyond the temperature and piles of snow, ice patches can be treacherous. Arthritic or senior pets are prone to slipping and falling. When possible, use a leash to help guide your pet to safe areas.

Inside is best. There is a mistaken belief that cats and dogs are more resistant to cold because of their fur coats. It is simply not true. Pets are susceptible to frostbite and hypothermia—even breeds like Huskies with thick coats. This also applies to leaving pets in cold cars.
If you are unable to keep your dog indoors, a warm shelter is crucial, as well as access to fresh (not frozen) water.
Watch for signs of hypothermia:

  • whining
  • shivering
  • anxietyWestVet is Idaho's 24/7 Veterinary Emergency Leader for Idaho's Pets
  • moving slowly
  • appearing weak
  • looking for warm places to burrow

Hypothermia is a serious veterinary emergency situation. Another cold-related injury is frostbite to a pet’s paws or extremities. Frostbite injuries may not appear until a few days after the damage is done. Regardless, if you suspect hypothermia or frostbite, seek veterinary care immediately.

Peek at paws: During and after a walk, check for cracked pads or bleeding. Sudden lameness/limping may be due to ice build-up between your pet’s toes. Snowshoes or booties for dogs are available at area pet retailers, as well as many options for sweaters or coats.

Wipe down: The AVMA also reminds pet owners to towel off your pet following outside play. The deicers and other chemicals used on walkways can cling to a dog’s feet, legs belly, and may be toxic. Wipe down/wash your pet to reduce the risk that your dog will be poisoned from licking the area.

 

If your family veterinarian is unavailable, WestVet provides veteirnary emergency care 24/7, no appointment is necessary for an animal emergency. Just come directly to our hospital at 5024 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, ID  83714.


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Pet Safety in Frigid Temperatures

Snow, ice, and frigid temperatures mean that pets need help to stay warm and safe.

Winter is in full swing throughout the northwest. With the Treasure Valley already blanketed in snow and temperatures forecasted to drop, it is critical that animal owners and caretakers protect pets from hypothermia, frostbite, slips and falls, and deicing salts and chemicals.

A few winter safety tips to consider:

Wellness exams. Cold temperatures may exacerbate certain medical conditions in your pet. These include arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, or hormonal imbalances. Idaho Frigid temperatures and pet safety - WestVet Veterinary Blog One preventative measure is to have your pet examined by your family veterinarian annually. Ask him/her about how your pet’s medical condition could be affected by changing temperatures.

Frigid and extreme cold. Just as intense heat is harmful to pets, single digit temperatures (and below!) are dangerous, too. Your pet’s ability to manage cold varies based on his/her age, the coat/fur density, body fat, activity level, and overall health. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) states, “Long-haired or thick-coated dogs tend to be more cold tolerant, but are still at risk in cold weather. Short-haired pets feel the cold faster because they have less protection, and short-legged pets may become cold faster because their bellies and bodies are more likely to come into contact with the snow-covered ground.”

Besides the cold temps and piles of snow, ice patches can be treacherous for pets. Arthritic or senior pets may be more prone to slipping and falling. Use a leash, and guide your pet to safe areas when possible.

Inside is best.  Clearly, with the frigid temperatures, it is best for pets to stay indoors. There is a mistaken belief that cats and dogs are more resistant to the cold because of their fur coats, however, it’s simply not true. Pets are susceptible to frostbite and hypothermia—even breeds like Huskies who have thick coats and generally enjoy more cold tolerance. This advice also applies to leaving pets in cold cars.

If you are unable to keep your dog indoors during cold weather, a warm shelter is crucial as well as access to fresh (not frozen) water. Watch for signs of cold-related problems in your pet including whining, shivering, anxiety, moving slowly---or not moving, appearing weak, and looking for warm places to burrow; all of these are signs of hypothermia— a serious veterinary emergency situation. WestVet 5024 W. Chinden Blvd. Garden City, ID 83714Frostbite damage may not show until a few days after the damage is done. Regardless, if you suspect your pet has hypothermia or frostbite, consult your veterinarian immediately.

 Peek at the paws: During and after a walk, check your dog’s paws for cold weather injuries like cracked pads or bleeding. In addition, if you notice a sudden lameness or limping during the walk, it may be due to ice build-up between your pet’s toes. You can purchase snowshoes or booties for dogs and cozy sweaters for those with short coats.  

Wipe down:  After you've been outside, check your dog’s feet, legs, and belly for deicers, antifreeze, or other chemicals that could be toxic. 

Stay safe and enjoy the season!


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WestVet’s new Animal Trauma Center serving families beginning Sunday, Dec. 5

The WestVet new trauma center is currently underway. We began the move of our specialty services on Thursday. Our (tireless) ER team has provided continuous services to our patients and their people throughout the transition.WestVet is at 5024 W. Chinden Blvd. in Garden City, Idaho

All services will be out of the new hospital early Sunday morning (December 4). The new trauma center is located adjacent to the long-standing facility. WestVet new hospital is open in Garden City - 24/7 Animal Emergency trauma centerYou will find us the corner of 50th/Chinden in Garden City, directly across the street from the Moxie Java bistro. The street address is 5024 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, ID  83714.

<iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/194100427" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe> <p><a href="https://vimeo.com/194100427">reception setup!</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/user16763492">WestVet Animal Emergency</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

We will be holding a public open house and ribbon cutting after the holidays, in January. We will invite everyone to come enjoy a behind-the-scenes tour and refreshments with us. 

Thank you for your support during these busy, exciting times! 

WestVet is Idaho's only 24/7 ANimal Emergency and Trauma Center


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